Let's Talk Bookish

Lets Talk Bookish- Is there a time limit on spoilers?

Welcome to my Let’s Talk Bookish post. Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky @eternitybooks, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts. So, this discussion post was supposed to be written in December, but due to time constraints I didn’t get a chance to post it then. So, here it is.

Previous week’s topic: Is there a time limit on spoilers?

My answer: Yes! I think spoilers are the worst. I hate when things are spoiled for me and I know others do too. However, if you don’t make an effort to see and/or read something after a certain point my sympathy fades a bit. I would say the larger question for me is how long do you have to wait?

I have two answers.

Two Weeks

My impatient answer is two weeks. I love talking and sharing my joy with people about good books or movies. I feel like I’m almost bursting if I can’t share my thoughts with anyone. This can be in on the internet or to people who have no intention of watching/reading whatever it is I’m excited about. I would say that this is the super fan timeline of willingness to wait.

A month

This is the more patient and understanding part of me. We all have busy lives and not all of us can read everything right as it comes out. A month gives someone much more time to go at their own pace and schedule without having to drop everything in order to beat the super fans and their crazy love.

Spoiler Warnings

I know I said there is a time limit on spoilers, but I think a nice thing to do is put a spoiler warning; especially, if you’re writing a review. People have very strong views on spoilers and whether you agree with them or not I wouldn’t recommend alienating readers. If you give a spoiler warning then at least people know what they’re getting into.


How do you feel about spoilers? Do you think that there is a time limit? If so, how long do you think it should be? I’d love to read your thoughts!

Let's Talk Bookish

Lets Talk Bookish – Biases with books & authors

Hello lovely readers and welcome to another Let’s Talk Bookish post! Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky@eternitybooks, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts.

I haven’t had time to do one of these in awhile with the holidays, but I’m excited to be able to participate again!

This week’s topic is: Does your like or dislike of an author bias you towards their books?

My answer: Yes, but only to a point.

I read for the stories not the authors

My author loyalty is low. I’m reading the book for the story so there is only one author I will give every single one of their books a shot and that’s Jordanna Max Brodsky. I love her books. The amount of detail she puts into them is just stunning and so I will always given them a shot.

All other authors I will read the summary of their book and see if I’m interested. I’m very particular about the books I choose to read for myself so if a book doesn’t sound interesting then I tend not to waste my money on it. I like Leigh Bardugo generally, but even with all the hype about Ninth House I have zero interest in reading it. However, authors that I know I like do get the benefit of me at least looking at their book. Half the battle I feel like is for people to even decided to pick your book up. I pay attention to the authors of stories I like and so if they say they are publishing a book I will automatically check it out. I will still decide based on the summary if I want to get it or not, but the chances are high that I’d probably like it. However, that habit can be a double edge sword for authors. If I don’t like the first book I read from them then it takes a lot for me to decide to pick up another one from them unless the summary is good. If the summary is good then I might be willing to give it another shot. If I read two books from an author though and don’t like either chances are I probably won’t read another one of their books.

Another bias that affects my decision to read a book

As much as authors only affect me to a point reviews are my kryptonite. I generally don’t read book reviews until after I’ve read the book. I find that even if I’m really excited about a book coming out, but it has even just some bad reviews it takes away most of the excitement I have for it. It’s horrible how easily I’m turned off books by bad reviews. It’s that fear of spending my money on a bad book syndrome.


How about you? Are you biased on books if they’re by certain authors? Are there any authors you would always read even if it didn’t sound like a book you’d enjoy? I look forward to reading your thoughts!

Top Ten Tuesdays

Top Ten Tuesday- Most Anticipated Book Releases for the First Half of 2020

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018.

This year looks (as always) like it’s going to be a great year for books. I can’t wait to show you these top ten books I’m excited about and to see yours as well! These books are put in chronological order of when they are being published.

Seven Deadly Shadows by Courtney Alameda and Valynee E. Maetani

published on January 28th


The Shadows between Us by Tricia Levenseller

Published February 25th


Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing by Charlie Adhara

Published on March 2nd


The Electric Heir by Victoria Lee

Published on March 17th


Queen of Coin and Whispers by Helen Corcoran

Published on April 6th


The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna

Published on May 26th


The Dark Tide by Alicia Jasinska

published on June 1st


Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas

Published on June 9th


Forest of Souls by Lori M. Lee

Published on June 23rd


The Empire of Gold by S. A. Chakraborty

published on June 30th


Those are my top ten books coming out in the first half of 2020. Do any of our books match? Have you heard of any of them before? I’d love to hear your thoughts!

Uncategorized

How Diverse Was My Reading for 2019?

Hello everyone, for this post I’m going to be looking over the books I’ve read this year and seeing if I’m actually meeting my goal of reading diversely. I’ll be looking at different aspects of the books I’ve read and going over them here. If you want to consider how diversely you’ve read then maybe consider some of these questions too. I’ve read a total of 40 published books this year. Not all these books were fantasy book, but we’ll count them anyway to make it easier.

Gender

Men: This year I read 13/ 40 books with male leads

Women: This year I read 24/40 with female leads

Trans/nonbinary: This year I read 1/20 books with a trans or nonbinary lead.

N/A: This year I read 2 nonfiction books that really had nothing to do with gender.


Race

This is a bit tricky due to reading fantasy novels, but many of the books I read had fairly obvious coding. These will be very broad categories. The N/A category is for nonfiction books or a character with a race that doesn’t exist in the real world.

So, looking at this I realize about 50% of my reading still has white or non-realistic races. Honestly, I thought it would be a lot lower.


Sexuality

Some of these books weren’t clue on whether the characters were bisexual vs gay vs pansexual. For the sake of ease if it isn’t specifically mentioned in the book I put then in the category based on the relationship they have in the book. N/A is for nonfiction as well as those that involved no obvious relationships or mention of them.

This is a bit more what I expected. A little bit more lgbtq+ reading than just the normal hetero couple. I tried to be very mindful of my reading about this in particular.


Intersectionality

This is a category I expect to be relatively low. The more diversely I tried to read the more I realized that many books are just focused on one type of diversity rather than having a character with multiple diverse elements.

LGBTQ+ characters with mental health representation: 2/40

LGBTQ+ characters who are also characters of color: 9/40

Characters of color with mental health representation: 3/40


Diverse Authors

It’s important to represent diverse authors too! This is based on the information that these authors readily have shared with the public.

Authors of Color: 14 authors

LGBTQ+ authors: 8 authors

Own Voices: 14 authors


Overall, I feel like its a pretty good start. Most of my reading was at least 50% diverse in these categories. I could definitely read more diversely, but I think my goal would be to maybe try and find more stories with better intersectionality. I only read 3 books this year that were fiction with a focus on straight, white people. A very good run for me I’d say. No reason we can’t all read diversely!


How about you? Have you thought about reading more diversely? Have you made any efforts? What is your favorite diverse book and/or author? I always love recommendations!

Fun Stuff

Blog Tour- Seduced by a Soldier by Melia Alexander

Hello, welcome to my stop on the Novel Take PR Blog tour for Seduced by a Soldier. A recently published RomCom novel. Check below for book blurbs, author info, a book teaser, and review.

Publisher: Entangled Publishing, LLC

Release Date (Print & Ebook/Audio): November 18, 2019

Length: Approximately 57,000 words

Subgenre: Romantic Comedy

Order:https://entangledpublishing.com/seduced-by-the-solider.html

Book blurb: Zandra York just got her big break, photographing a major project for a travel magazine. So what if she’s never traveled out of the country before? Or that she’s more adept at deciphering fraudulent financial statements than reading German train schedules? Her brother Jackson is on his way to act as her guide, and she can’t wait to experience Europe with him.

But when Jackson’s overprotective best friend gets off the plane instead, Zandra knows this will not end well.

There isn’t a damned thing Special Forces instructor Blake Monroe wouldn’t do for his best friend, but babysit Zandra when Jackson is unexpectedly called away on a mission? Nope. Not on the list. Especially not when she proves to be more trouble than he can handle—and far too tempting.

Between accidentally hiring a hearse as their rideshare, an unprovoked goat attack, and photographing erotic-shaped chocolates, Blake and Zandra can’t keep their hands off each other. But Zandra’s new career is about to send her all over the world and Blake is finally ready to settle down after his next deployment.

He’ll never ask her to give up her dreams. And she’ll never ask him to give up his.

Author

Melia Alexander is the author of sassy, sexy, fun contemporary romances, but is also fortunate to spend her week days at The Male Observation Lab (a.k.a. her job at a construction company) where she gets to observe guys in their natural habitat. Though they often behave like typical alpha males, she’s often seen through their personas to the heart of who they really are – the heroes of their own stories. A native of Guam, Melia traded in warm, tropical breezes for the rainy Pacific Northwest. She’s an avid reader who also loves romantic comedies – preferably with a glass of Cab Sauv and a box of dark chocolates nearby. In her free time, she’s busy conquering her CrossFit fears: ring dips, power cleans, and the dreaded 800 meter run.

Connect with Melia: WebsiteNewsletter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest

Book Teaser

“What’s happening here?”

          Zandra hadn’t meant to ask the question. Really, she’d figured that if she played her cards right, she’d skate through the next week with Blake and then head for home. Hell, they weren’t even on the same flight, so there’d be no awkward airplane good-byes, but maybe a friendly hug at the airport.

          At least, that had been the plan, only now…

          There was an undercurrent of tension between them, and not the bad kind, either. No, this tension electrified, practically crackled the air around them. Judging by the quiet intensity in Blake’s gaze, he wasn’t immune to it, either.

          “I’m not sure I know,” he said. He blew out an audible breath. “This wasn’t exactly something I’d counted on.”

Review

This book was not for me. I’m generally not a huge romance person, but I can sometimes get behind a good RomCom and the idea of a soldier and a photographer together was interesting. Honestly though it just didn’t sell me. Zandra and Blake are characters with their own goals and dreams which I can respect and enjoy. However, the situations these two managed to get themselves in seemed a bit far fetched or Zandra was so clueless it made me embarrassed for her. All Blake could think about was his attraction to her usually based on her physical characters rather than her personality. If you like cooky romances that are a bit more on the smutty, sexual tension side of things you could very well enjoy this book. Which I think is the intended audience, but if you want something deeper with real developed feelings and a strong female lead this wouldn’t be your cup of tea.

Let's Talk Bookish

Let’s Talk Bookish: Should readers read books that aren’t for their target age?

Welcome to my Let’s Talk Bookish post. Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky @eternitybooks, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts. Normally, this is posted on Friday, but nanowrimo is kinda kicking my butt so I’m a bit late.

This week’s post topic is: should readers read books that aren’t for their target age?

Well, considering a lot of my books reviews are on YA fantasy and I’m an adult so I’m going to say absolutely. We are all drawn to the books that appeal and speak to us. Harry Potter is still so popular because readers of all ages reader the books. I don’t think it’s fair to say that only one age group can read any book. Some young people are more mature and can read adult books, some adults prefer YA books. Reading is suppose to generally be an enjoyable experience. I think the only time it isn’t is when you are forced to read something you don’t want to.

Being mindful of your voice when reading outside the target community

I think the real problem with reading outside your target age is when you try to take too much ownership of that space. Everyone has a right to an opinion and can review how they’d like, but as an adult reviewing YA books my voice should not try and speak of the voices of young adults who are reading these books. The books were written with them in mind. It is not my job to try and police them or try to argue with what they’re saying. I can disagree, but it shouldn’t be my voice that is the loudest. This is really true for when reading any book that belongs to a community that isn’t yours. You have your right to your review and your feelings, but your voice should not be speaking over those from within that community. You could love a book and it’s harmful to that community, you could hate a book and that community could be in love with it. Let that community speak for it. Your job is to be in the supporting role of raising those voices if that’s what you’d like. Please stay in your lane.


What do you think? Should you read outside of your target age range? What are your thoughts on reviewing books outside of your community? I’d love to hear what you think!

Let's Talk Bookish

Let’s Talk Bookish: Are TBRs need to be a book blogger/reader?

Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky @ Eternity Books, where we discuss certain topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts. Posts are written on Friday’s.

This Friday’s discussion the question is do you need to have a TBR to be considered a book blogger/reader?

First, for those of you who might be confused. TBR is an acronym meaning To Be Read. Many readers have lists of books that they really want to read, but haven’t yet had the time. Hence, the creation of TBR list.

Secondly, the very simple answer. No, absolutely not. You don’t need a TBR to be a book blogger/reader. Your book blog is whatever you make it and if you don’t have a TBR and aren’t worried about it then its not a big deal. Most book bloggers want smaller TBRs so if you don’t have one then you’re already ahead of the game.

Why it might feel like you need a TBR

So, this question really threw me for a loop if I’m honest. I feel like my answer is the obvious answer, but as I continued to think about it I can see how someone could really wonder about it. The book blogging community talks A TON about TBRs. It’s a uniting force within our community, because most of us have them. There are even reading challenges based specifically on getting your TBR list under control. I can see if you’re someone with no TBR to speak of that it might seem like you’re missing something. However, outside of bonding over the length of your TBR or similar conversation you’re not missing anything. You are still a very valid reader and blogger TBR or no.

If I don’t need one why are they a big deal?

  1. Community. As I mentioned before the book blogging community really seems to bond over TBRs. It’s nice sometimes to know you’re not the only one obsessing over book or have a large stack of unread books on your shelf especially if you have friends that aren’t big readers.
  2. They help people remember the books they want to read. As a book lover I want to read SO MANY BOOKS. I don’t have time or money to purchase all the books that I’ve seen that I think I would enjoy, but a part of my bookish heart dies at the thought of forgetting about a book that I was once so excited to read. That is why I have a TBR via Goodreads.
  3. People enjoy lists. There’s nothing more satisfying then making a list or setting a goal then getting to cross off a line of it as often as you can. While a small fraction of the reason I have a TBR it is nice to get that feeling of success not only from having read a good book, but also being one step closer to reaching your goal of books you’d like to read.

So, in short if you have a TBR that’s cool, but also if you don’t that’s also cool. You are still a reader and a book blogger if you don’t have TBR. I applaud your restraint at not hoarding books like a possessive dragon.


So, what do you think? Do you feel like you need to have a TBR to be a valid member of the book community? Do you have a TBR? I look forward to hearing your thoughts.