Let's Talk Bookish

Lets Talk Bookish- Is there a time limit on spoilers?

Welcome to my Let’s Talk Bookish post. Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky @eternitybooks, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts. So, this discussion post was supposed to be written in December, but due to time constraints I didn’t get a chance to post it then. So, here it is.

Previous week’s topic: Is there a time limit on spoilers?

My answer: Yes! I think spoilers are the worst. I hate when things are spoiled for me and I know others do too. However, if you don’t make an effort to see and/or read something after a certain point my sympathy fades a bit. I would say the larger question for me is how long do you have to wait?

I have two answers.

Two Weeks

My impatient answer is two weeks. I love talking and sharing my joy with people about good books or movies. I feel like I’m almost bursting if I can’t share my thoughts with anyone. This can be in on the internet or to people who have no intention of watching/reading whatever it is I’m excited about. I would say that this is the super fan timeline of willingness to wait.

A month

This is the more patient and understanding part of me. We all have busy lives and not all of us can read everything right as it comes out. A month gives someone much more time to go at their own pace and schedule without having to drop everything in order to beat the super fans and their crazy love.

Spoiler Warnings

I know I said there is a time limit on spoilers, but I think a nice thing to do is put a spoiler warning; especially, if you’re writing a review. People have very strong views on spoilers and whether you agree with them or not I wouldn’t recommend alienating readers. If you give a spoiler warning then at least people know what they’re getting into.


How do you feel about spoilers? Do you think that there is a time limit? If so, how long do you think it should be? I’d love to read your thoughts!

Let's Talk Bookish

Lets Talk Bookish – Biases with books & authors

Hello lovely readers and welcome to another Let’s Talk Bookish post! Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky@eternitybooks, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts.

I haven’t had time to do one of these in awhile with the holidays, but I’m excited to be able to participate again!

This week’s topic is: Does your like or dislike of an author bias you towards their books?

My answer: Yes, but only to a point.

I read for the stories not the authors

My author loyalty is low. I’m reading the book for the story so there is only one author I will give every single one of their books a shot and that’s Jordanna Max Brodsky. I love her books. The amount of detail she puts into them is just stunning and so I will always given them a shot.

All other authors I will read the summary of their book and see if I’m interested. I’m very particular about the books I choose to read for myself so if a book doesn’t sound interesting then I tend not to waste my money on it. I like Leigh Bardugo generally, but even with all the hype about Ninth House I have zero interest in reading it. However, authors that I know I like do get the benefit of me at least looking at their book. Half the battle I feel like is for people to even decided to pick your book up. I pay attention to the authors of stories I like and so if they say they are publishing a book I will automatically check it out. I will still decide based on the summary if I want to get it or not, but the chances are high that I’d probably like it. However, that habit can be a double edge sword for authors. If I don’t like the first book I read from them then it takes a lot for me to decide to pick up another one from them unless the summary is good. If the summary is good then I might be willing to give it another shot. If I read two books from an author though and don’t like either chances are I probably won’t read another one of their books.

Another bias that affects my decision to read a book

As much as authors only affect me to a point reviews are my kryptonite. I generally don’t read book reviews until after I’ve read the book. I find that even if I’m really excited about a book coming out, but it has even just some bad reviews it takes away most of the excitement I have for it. It’s horrible how easily I’m turned off books by bad reviews. It’s that fear of spending my money on a bad book syndrome.


How about you? Are you biased on books if they’re by certain authors? Are there any authors you would always read even if it didn’t sound like a book you’d enjoy? I look forward to reading your thoughts!

Let's Talk Bookish

Let’s Talk Bookish: Should readers read books that aren’t for their target age?

Welcome to my Let’s Talk Bookish post. Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky @eternitybooks, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts. Normally, this is posted on Friday, but nanowrimo is kinda kicking my butt so I’m a bit late.

This week’s post topic is: should readers read books that aren’t for their target age?

Well, considering a lot of my books reviews are on YA fantasy and I’m an adult so I’m going to say absolutely. We are all drawn to the books that appeal and speak to us. Harry Potter is still so popular because readers of all ages reader the books. I don’t think it’s fair to say that only one age group can read any book. Some young people are more mature and can read adult books, some adults prefer YA books. Reading is suppose to generally be an enjoyable experience. I think the only time it isn’t is when you are forced to read something you don’t want to.

Being mindful of your voice when reading outside the target community

I think the real problem with reading outside your target age is when you try to take too much ownership of that space. Everyone has a right to an opinion and can review how they’d like, but as an adult reviewing YA books my voice should not try and speak of the voices of young adults who are reading these books. The books were written with them in mind. It is not my job to try and police them or try to argue with what they’re saying. I can disagree, but it shouldn’t be my voice that is the loudest. This is really true for when reading any book that belongs to a community that isn’t yours. You have your right to your review and your feelings, but your voice should not be speaking over those from within that community. You could love a book and it’s harmful to that community, you could hate a book and that community could be in love with it. Let that community speak for it. Your job is to be in the supporting role of raising those voices if that’s what you’d like. Please stay in your lane.


What do you think? Should you read outside of your target age range? What are your thoughts on reviewing books outside of your community? I’d love to hear what you think!

Let's Talk Bookish

Let’s Talk Bookish: Are TBRs need to be a book blogger/reader?

Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky @ Eternity Books, where we discuss certain topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts. Posts are written on Friday’s.

This Friday’s discussion the question is do you need to have a TBR to be considered a book blogger/reader?

First, for those of you who might be confused. TBR is an acronym meaning To Be Read. Many readers have lists of books that they really want to read, but haven’t yet had the time. Hence, the creation of TBR list.

Secondly, the very simple answer. No, absolutely not. You don’t need a TBR to be a book blogger/reader. Your book blog is whatever you make it and if you don’t have a TBR and aren’t worried about it then its not a big deal. Most book bloggers want smaller TBRs so if you don’t have one then you’re already ahead of the game.

Why it might feel like you need a TBR

So, this question really threw me for a loop if I’m honest. I feel like my answer is the obvious answer, but as I continued to think about it I can see how someone could really wonder about it. The book blogging community talks A TON about TBRs. It’s a uniting force within our community, because most of us have them. There are even reading challenges based specifically on getting your TBR list under control. I can see if you’re someone with no TBR to speak of that it might seem like you’re missing something. However, outside of bonding over the length of your TBR or similar conversation you’re not missing anything. You are still a very valid reader and blogger TBR or no.

If I don’t need one why are they a big deal?

  1. Community. As I mentioned before the book blogging community really seems to bond over TBRs. It’s nice sometimes to know you’re not the only one obsessing over book or have a large stack of unread books on your shelf especially if you have friends that aren’t big readers.
  2. They help people remember the books they want to read. As a book lover I want to read SO MANY BOOKS. I don’t have time or money to purchase all the books that I’ve seen that I think I would enjoy, but a part of my bookish heart dies at the thought of forgetting about a book that I was once so excited to read. That is why I have a TBR via Goodreads.
  3. People enjoy lists. There’s nothing more satisfying then making a list or setting a goal then getting to cross off a line of it as often as you can. While a small fraction of the reason I have a TBR it is nice to get that feeling of success not only from having read a good book, but also being one step closer to reaching your goal of books you’d like to read.

So, in short if you have a TBR that’s cool, but also if you don’t that’s also cool. You are still a reader and a book blogger if you don’t have TBR. I applaud your restraint at not hoarding books like a possessive dragon.


So, what do you think? Do you feel like you need to have a TBR to be a valid member of the book community? Do you have a TBR? I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

Let's Talk Bookish

Let’s Talk Bookish- Sexual Content in YA

Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky @ Eternity Books, where we discuss certain topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts. Posts are written on Friday’s.

This Friday’s topic is sexual content in YA and is there too much?

I find this topic interesting, but also makes me feel old for really feeling like I might have an answer.

What even is sexual content?

I feel like in order to truly answer this question I need to let you know what I define as sexual content in YA. When I think sexual content I’m going to be honest and say I mostly think of graphic sex. This is probably because I’ve read a lot of other adult stories that have a heavy romance element, but that’s what I think of. If it’s in YA though I scale it back a bit, because honestly the USA is generally pretty prudish about sex and young people. The USA on a whole is not a sex positive country. So, sexual content in YA strike me as detailed descriptions of kissing, groping, or beyond.

Is there too much in YA?

In my opinion, no there isn’t too much sexual content in YA. Maybe it’s because I read mostly YA fantasy, but I honestly haven’t read much sexual content in YA at all. Sure there are descriptions of kissing sometimes and on rare occasion more than that, but it never seems excessive or generally graphic. Is this a thing in YA romance? I’m not sure, but really I don’t feel the need to be the morality police when it comes to sexual content. I think we as a society need to become more sex positive where we are more honest about sex and sex education. As an educator I know the whole absence only teaching doesn’t work and I kinda feel that way about sexual content. Also, young adults deserve to have themselves represented in their age group’s stories. Some people are sexually active at a fairly young age. You can feel how you want about that, but that doesn’t take away the fact that it happens. Even if young adults aren’t sexually active they still know what sex and related behaviors are. Most schools do sex ed around 5th and 6th grade.

My Personal Preferred Handling of YA sexual content

My biggest concern about anything having to do with YA and relationships is how relationships are portrayed. I feel like there are many books where there are a girl and a boy, they’re working together or something, and BAM they love each other. There’s no build, there’s just hey we’re around each other and attractive, we’re obviously meant to be together forever. Please show young people how to actually have and start a relationship. OR, and this one is worse, one character is mean to the other character, but they still fall in love and its never addressed. I get unhealthy relationship vibes and it makes me cringe. Now, I think exploring unhealthy relationships and the consequences/ effects of that are fine topics to explore. I think some young adults may need to read those stories. What I don’t like is unhealthy relationships being seen as an epic modern romance. Personally, when I was younger I didn’t really see the problems with it as I do now, but I remember hoping maybe one day to have a romance like in the books I read. I had no idea that a relationship like that wouldn’t be the ideal or healthy. Now, obviously as you learn and grow you can usually figure out what is a more healthy option, but as a young person its confusing and I’d just prefer better book role models. Please don’t teach people that abuse is attractive.

So, I kinda got off on a tangent there, but no I don’t personally believe there is too much sexual content in YA.


What do you think? Do you agree or disagree? Have you even thought about this topic before? I’d love to hear what you think!

Let's Talk Bookish

Let’s Talk Bookish: Star Ratings-Are they fair or necessary?

Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky @ Eternity Books, where we discuss certain topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts. Posts are written on Friday’s.

For this talk the discussion topic is if star ratings are fair or necessary. This question has been posted before on different social media and blogs before and I still have mixed feelings about it.

Are star ratings fair?

Personally I believe that I suppose it depends on your definition of fair. Ratings are purely opinion-based normally so I would say that there’s nothing inherently fair about it, but it’s not supposed to be either. The star rating system is a quick glance at a person’s opinion about something. It doesn’t give a lot of detail which is why I think reviews with star ratings are super important, but I would say star ratings are ratings of convenience that can easily draw people into your review. I know there are been times where I see and excellent or terrible star rating and both pull me in to read the review more so than an average three star review would. If you view all opinions as fair than I would say yes star ratings are fair. Everyone has the right to an opinion and I believe they also have a right to express that opinion even though we might not like it or agree with it. However, star ratings are based as I mentioned before on opinion. There are very few that are objective and if you think about that then star ratings could never truly be fair. There’s no real criteria for ensuring fairness or what my one star ratings means compared to your one star rating. In fact, star ratings vary widely between book bloggers, but I believe we if know that going in it may even out the playing field at least a bit.

Are star ratings necessary?

Are they necessary? No, I would say they’re not necessary, but they do make quick glances a lot easier. I think the only real value to a star rating is for a quick glance understanding of a product. It’s not honestly that helpful to me without a review and this goes for any product not just a book. If something is rated with a really low score I want to know why just like I want to know why it received so many great ones. I know that star ratings though can often help or hurt an author’s chances of selling a book. You could perhaps review star ratings as a necessary helpful marketing tool in some cases I suppose.

Overall, I would say that while convenient and I will continue to use star rating I would say there is nothing inherently fair about them nor are they necessary. However, the possibility of using the star rating as a way to draw readers or quickly share my opinion is too much of a draw for me. I do try to be thoughtful when I create star ratings myself, but I can understand the debate about them.


What are your thoughts? Do you think star ratings are necessary or fair? Is there some other system we could be using? I’d love to hear your thoughts!