Let's Talk Bookish

Lets Talk Bookish- Is there a time limit on spoilers?

Welcome to my Let’s Talk Bookish post. Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky @eternitybooks, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts. So, this discussion post was supposed to be written in December, but due to time constraints I didn’t get a chance to post it then. So, here it is.

Previous week’s topic: Is there a time limit on spoilers?

My answer: Yes! I think spoilers are the worst. I hate when things are spoiled for me and I know others do too. However, if you don’t make an effort to see and/or read something after a certain point my sympathy fades a bit. I would say the larger question for me is how long do you have to wait?

I have two answers.

Two Weeks

My impatient answer is two weeks. I love talking and sharing my joy with people about good books or movies. I feel like I’m almost bursting if I can’t share my thoughts with anyone. This can be in on the internet or to people who have no intention of watching/reading whatever it is I’m excited about. I would say that this is the super fan timeline of willingness to wait.

A month

This is the more patient and understanding part of me. We all have busy lives and not all of us can read everything right as it comes out. A month gives someone much more time to go at their own pace and schedule without having to drop everything in order to beat the super fans and their crazy love.

Spoiler Warnings

I know I said there is a time limit on spoilers, but I think a nice thing to do is put a spoiler warning; especially, if you’re writing a review. People have very strong views on spoilers and whether you agree with them or not I wouldn’t recommend alienating readers. If you give a spoiler warning then at least people know what they’re getting into.


How do you feel about spoilers? Do you think that there is a time limit? If so, how long do you think it should be? I’d love to read your thoughts!

Let's Talk Bookish

Lets Talk Bookish – Biases with books & authors

Hello lovely readers and welcome to another Let’s Talk Bookish post! Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by Rukky@eternitybooks, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts.

I haven’t had time to do one of these in awhile with the holidays, but I’m excited to be able to participate again!

This week’s topic is: Does your like or dislike of an author bias you towards their books?

My answer: Yes, but only to a point.

I read for the stories not the authors

My author loyalty is low. I’m reading the book for the story so there is only one author I will give every single one of their books a shot and that’s Jordanna Max Brodsky. I love her books. The amount of detail she puts into them is just stunning and so I will always given them a shot.

All other authors I will read the summary of their book and see if I’m interested. I’m very particular about the books I choose to read for myself so if a book doesn’t sound interesting then I tend not to waste my money on it. I like Leigh Bardugo generally, but even with all the hype about Ninth House I have zero interest in reading it. However, authors that I know I like do get the benefit of me at least looking at their book. Half the battle I feel like is for people to even decided to pick your book up. I pay attention to the authors of stories I like and so if they say they are publishing a book I will automatically check it out. I will still decide based on the summary if I want to get it or not, but the chances are high that I’d probably like it. However, that habit can be a double edge sword for authors. If I don’t like the first book I read from them then it takes a lot for me to decide to pick up another one from them unless the summary is good. If the summary is good then I might be willing to give it another shot. If I read two books from an author though and don’t like either chances are I probably won’t read another one of their books.

Another bias that affects my decision to read a book

As much as authors only affect me to a point reviews are my kryptonite. I generally don’t read book reviews until after I’ve read the book. I find that even if I’m really excited about a book coming out, but it has even just some bad reviews it takes away most of the excitement I have for it. It’s horrible how easily I’m turned off books by bad reviews. It’s that fear of spending my money on a bad book syndrome.


How about you? Are you biased on books if they’re by certain authors? Are there any authors you would always read even if it didn’t sound like a book you’d enjoy? I look forward to reading your thoughts!

Reviews

A Must Read Sequel – Storm of Locust by Rebecca Roanhorse Review

Overall enjoyment: 5/5

World building: 4/5

Characterization: 5/5

Diversity: 3/5

Goodreads summary:

“It’s been four weeks since the bloody showdown at Black Mesa, and Maggie Hoskie, Diné monster hunter, is trying to make the best of things. Only her latest bounty hunt has gone sideways, she’s lost her only friend, Kai Arviso, and she’s somehow found herself responsible for a girl with a strange clan power.

Then the Goodacre twins show up at Maggie’s door with the news that Kai and the youngest Goodacre, Caleb, have fallen in with a mysterious cult, led by a figure out of Navajo legend called the White Locust. The Goodacres are convinced that Kai’s a true believer, but Maggie suspects there’s more to Kai’s new faith than meets the eye. She vows to track down the White Locust, then rescue Kai and make things right between them.

Her search leads her beyond the Walls of Dinétah and straight into the horrors of the Big Water world outside. With the aid of a motley collection of allies, Maggie must battle body harvesters, newborn casino gods and, ultimately, the White Locust himself. But the cult leader is nothing like she suspected, and Kai might not need rescuing after all. When the full scope of the White Locust’s plans are revealed, Maggie’s burgeoning trust in her friends, and herself, will be pushed to the breaking point, and not everyone will survive.”

This is the sequel to the book Trail of Lightning, and I loved this book more than the first one! Roanhorse really is a very talented writer. We’re introduced to a couple new characters and get an even deeper look at who Kai and Maggie are. Be prepared for an interesting new story line with the same beloved characters. So, buckle up you’re in for an exciting and enjoyable ride.

Characters. Maggie is back and as interesting and complex as ever. Maggie is still a no-nonsense monster hunter, but she’s been taking some to look a bit deeper at who she wants to be. I think what I love most about Maggie is that she is a tough character, but also Roanhorse allows her to also be hurt and vulnerable. This I think is what makes Maggie a dynamic character and why I love her so much. She’s so strong most of the time, but when you look inside she’s lonely and hurt by the loss that she’s experienced. Kai, still the absolute best! You don’t see much in this novel. He’s away doing some stuff, but you hear about him through other characters. He sounds as loving and generous as when readers first met him. Also, there’s a scene. Wow, this guy is powerful. I love what he can do. This would honestly make an excellent movie. You see more of Rissa as well. She’s just as complex as Maggie and just as not-to-be-trifled with. You get a bit more of her backstory as well. It comes in handy though not in a way I would anticipate. We also meet a new character, she goes by Ben. She’s young and hurt, but bring a bit of youthfulness to everything.

The world building continues to be interesting although it takes a darker turn in this book. Maggie is leaving the safety of the walls of Dinétah and is introduced to the dangers of the outside world. I don’t want to say too much more than that because I think it could give away some spoilers, but Roanhorse does an excellent job at creating a dangerous, apocalyptic world. I would warn that this content could be a bit triggering depending on your personal experiences, but Roanhorse keeps the worst to vague description so I would be aware, but not too concerned. I think it hits on some serious real world issues. We also learn a bit more about clan powers and how they manifest which was really eye opening when it came to the plot.

The diversity continues to be mainly racial with indigenous and black characters leading the story. I have really enjoyed the look into indigenous beliefs and gods. I’m unfamiliar with Navajo beliefs so I’m not quite sure how true versus fantasy-based Roanhorse’s writing is, but I really enjoyed the continuing of indigenous-inspired fantasy. I also really enjoyed how female driven this particular book was. This series is of course focused on Maggie, but this book really puts many of our male characters in the backseat and really lets the women shine!

Overall, if you like the first book or haven’t read it yet I would highly recommend this series. The characters and their development are excellent, the world is interesting, and the plot is immersive. Go check it out!


Have you read this exciting series yet? Have you read this book of A Trail of Lightning? Is it on your TBR?

Top Ten Tuesdays

Top Ten Tuesday- Most Anticipated Book Releases for the First Half of 2020

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018.

This year looks (as always) like it’s going to be a great year for books. I can’t wait to show you these top ten books I’m excited about and to see yours as well! These books are put in chronological order of when they are being published.

Seven Deadly Shadows by Courtney Alameda and Valynee E. Maetani

published on January 28th


The Shadows between Us by Tricia Levenseller

Published February 25th


Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing by Charlie Adhara

Published on March 2nd


The Electric Heir by Victoria Lee

Published on March 17th


Queen of Coin and Whispers by Helen Corcoran

Published on April 6th


The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna

Published on May 26th


The Dark Tide by Alicia Jasinska

published on June 1st


Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas

Published on June 9th


Forest of Souls by Lori M. Lee

Published on June 23rd


The Empire of Gold by S. A. Chakraborty

published on June 30th


Those are my top ten books coming out in the first half of 2020. Do any of our books match? Have you heard of any of them before? I’d love to hear your thoughts!

Uncategorized

How Diverse Was My Reading for 2019?

Hello everyone, for this post I’m going to be looking over the books I’ve read this year and seeing if I’m actually meeting my goal of reading diversely. I’ll be looking at different aspects of the books I’ve read and going over them here. If you want to consider how diversely you’ve read then maybe consider some of these questions too. I’ve read a total of 40 published books this year. Not all these books were fantasy book, but we’ll count them anyway to make it easier.

Gender

Men: This year I read 13/ 40 books with male leads

Women: This year I read 24/40 with female leads

Trans/nonbinary: This year I read 1/20 books with a trans or nonbinary lead.

N/A: This year I read 2 nonfiction books that really had nothing to do with gender.


Race

This is a bit tricky due to reading fantasy novels, but many of the books I read had fairly obvious coding. These will be very broad categories. The N/A category is for nonfiction books or a character with a race that doesn’t exist in the real world.

So, looking at this I realize about 50% of my reading still has white or non-realistic races. Honestly, I thought it would be a lot lower.


Sexuality

Some of these books weren’t clue on whether the characters were bisexual vs gay vs pansexual. For the sake of ease if it isn’t specifically mentioned in the book I put then in the category based on the relationship they have in the book. N/A is for nonfiction as well as those that involved no obvious relationships or mention of them.

This is a bit more what I expected. A little bit more lgbtq+ reading than just the normal hetero couple. I tried to be very mindful of my reading about this in particular.


Intersectionality

This is a category I expect to be relatively low. The more diversely I tried to read the more I realized that many books are just focused on one type of diversity rather than having a character with multiple diverse elements.

LGBTQ+ characters with mental health representation: 2/40

LGBTQ+ characters who are also characters of color: 9/40

Characters of color with mental health representation: 3/40


Diverse Authors

It’s important to represent diverse authors too! This is based on the information that these authors readily have shared with the public.

Authors of Color: 14 authors

LGBTQ+ authors: 8 authors

Own Voices: 14 authors


Overall, I feel like its a pretty good start. Most of my reading was at least 50% diverse in these categories. I could definitely read more diversely, but I think my goal would be to maybe try and find more stories with better intersectionality. I only read 3 books this year that were fiction with a focus on straight, white people. A very good run for me I’d say. No reason we can’t all read diversely!


How about you? Have you thought about reading more diversely? Have you made any efforts? What is your favorite diverse book and/or author? I always love recommendations!

Reviews

All the Feels – A Review of Heartsong by TJ Klune

Overall Enjoyment: 5/5

World building: 3/5

Characterization: 5/5

Diversity: 3/5

Goodreads Summary:

“All Robbie Fontaine ever wanted was a place to belong. After the death of his mother, he bounces around from pack to pack, forming temporary bonds to keep from turning feral. It’s enough—until he receives a summons from the wolf stronghold in Caswell, Maine.

Life as the trusted second to Michelle Hughes—the Alpha of all—and the cherished friend of a gentle old witch teaches Robbie what it means to be pack, to have a home.

But when a mission from Michelle sends Robbie into the field, he finds himself questioning where he belongs and everything he’s been told. Whispers of traitorous wolves and wild magic abound—but who are the traitors and who the betrayed?

More than anything, Robbie hungers for answers, because one of those alleged traitors is Kelly Bennett—the wolf who may be his mate.

The truth has a way of coming out. And when it does, everything will shatter.”

I have been waiting for the third book in this series for a while. I love these characters and I love reading about how these characters end up getting together. One of the staples of this series is that the focus couple always go through a struggle before they get together. We get that again in Kelly and Robbie’s story too although with a different spin on it than has been taken in the past two books. If you have like the first two books in this series, I believe you with like this one as well. It brings some parts of our story closed while opening open another. I can’t wait for the final book in this series!

The world building in this story is always tricky to quantify. It has paranormal elements within a modern world. I gave it an average rating because Klune really does a great job about giving us descriptions of not only places of interest, but the grouping of witches and werewolves all have a bit of culture and our characters have an explored backstory that I always enjoyed. There’s a lot of magic in this book that I feel like was a bit handwavy at points compared the previous books, but I didn’t feel like it took a ton away from the story.

The characters and their bonds with one another are the true reason why I read these books. They have lots of jokes, but few books have characters that are so vocal about their love for each other outside of the romantic couple. These characters shine with love for each other and I feel like this book particularly focuses on the pack’s relationship to each other even more so than normal. Robbie finally gets his moment to shine in this book. It really is his story for a large part of the books so if you have been hoping for more of him then you’re in luck you really get the most of him. Kelly too. Oh, my goodness, the sweetest of the brothers in some respects or perhaps the softest. There is a letter in this book that will just melt your heart.  

The diversity is still minimum outside of the lgtbq+ element. Kelly is asexual. We have a latinx character that is given a bit more attention.  There is also a black woman introduced but her role is so minimal I’m not really sure why she was included at all unless she has more importance later on.

Overall, I’m just in love with this series. It has all the character feels that I crave in a book. The plot outside of the romance element is compelling and is great at keeping you on your toes. It’s the whole package really so if you like werewolves, close families, and beautiful love I couldn’t recommend this enough for you.


Have you ever read a novel in the Green Creek series? Have you ever read anything by TJ Klune? What do you think of this book? Would you put it on your TBR?

lists

Mood Reading List: Love- The Good, Bad, and the What is Even Happening?

Hello lovely readers, I toyed with the idea of doing some posts about mood reading for awhile now. I definitely go through stages throughout the year of what type of books I’m interested in reading and figured there were other readers out there who are similar. In these mood reading posts I will provide a list of books that are based on a certain theme. This posts theme is obviously love. Below, I have listed a variety of book based on the type of love you’re interested in. Each title has a Goodreads link if you want to learn more about the book.

If you want deep and beautiful love

Red, White, and Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston. Representation-lgbtq+ characters w/ focus on gay relationship. biracial character

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger Representation- none really. straight, white couple, but there’s time travel

If you want love is a hellscape or at least it doesn’t solve anything

Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi representation- characters of color (African)

Girls of Storm and Shadow by Natasha Ngan representation- women of color in lesbian relationship (Asian)

If you want super slow build

The Other series by Anne Bishop representation: not much, some light mental illness

If you want it hurts so good

The Green Creek Series by T. J Klune representation – gay men

If you want Do They Actually Like/Love Each Other?!

The Folk of the Air series by Holly Black representation – minor characters of color

The Fever King by Victoria Lee representation – biracial, jewish character, lgbtq+ men in gay relationship

If you want a more realistic romance in a fantasy setting

Olympus Bound series by Jordanna Max Brodsky representation – none, but greek gods/goddesses are cool

Once & Future by Amy Rose Capetta and Cori McCarthy. representation – lgbtq+ characters, characters of color, nonbinary character, gay and lesbian main relationships

If you want slow and secret

Girls of Paper and Fire by Natasha Ngan representation – women of color in lesbian relationship (Asian)

Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim representation – people of color (Asian)

If you want romantic elements, but maybe no quite a full romance

A Storm of Locust by Rebecca Roanhourse representation – people of color (Indigenous)

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia representation – people of color (Latinx)


What do you think of the list and the categories? Do you have any books you enjoy reading that have love as a large theme in the fantasy genre? I’d love to read your thoughts!