Book Haul

My Summer Book Haul

So, this summer has been pretty crazy for me. However, when I have the rare day off I often find my way back into the book store purchasing books I have no time to read. Whether I can read them or not though I am nonetheless super excited about them! Check out my summer book haul! All title contain a link back to Goodreads if you’re interested in summaries and ratings.

My Physical Books

Spin the Dawn: I got this book as an ARC from Netgalley and I couldn’t be more thrilled by this book. If you enjoy beautifully written mythology and fantasy adventure quests then I really couldn’t recommend this book enough to you. I honestly can’t wait until the next book.

Once & Future: I’ve been waiting for this book ever since I heard about it. I’m not really a big fan of SyFy, but a gender bent Arthurian tale? I’m just too intrigued to pass it up. I’m so excited to read this.

This Time Will Be Different: Not a fantasy novel, but the summary about flower shops and historical inequality seemed so soft, but powerful to me that I wanted to give it a shot.

Gods of Jade and Shadow: Much like Spin the Dawn I got this as an ARC from Netgalley and I just fell in love with it. If you’re interested in some Mayan mythology and some ideas that make you think you’ll fall in love with this book as much as I did.

Kings, Queens, and In-betweens: I tried to get this as an ARC on Netgalley, but unfortunately didn’t get access to it. This seems like the best type of story that anyone whose different might be interested in reading. It seems to be about finding yourself, but without the limitations of labels or expectations.

The Candle and the Flame: I wanted this book if nothing for its beautiful cover, but I kinda lost track of it until I saw it in the bookstore. I’ve always been interested in the silk road and if you’re going to add a fantasy element I can’t wait to see how it reads.

Nocturna: I really hadn’t heard of this story anywhere, but I saw it in the bookstore and it caught my interest. Gods of Jade and Shadow definitely peaked my interest in Latinx-inspired stories and I’m excited to give this story a read.

The Wise Man’s Fear: There is probably going to be zero diversity in this novel, but it’s a continuation of a book I’ve already read and really enjoyed. The storytelling and world building is just phenomenal.


My Netgalley E-books

Blood of the Pack: I can’t really recommend this book. I struggled to get through it, but if you’re intrigued, but lesbian werewolves you may want to check it out.

Wildflowers: Allaha of the Mountain: The summary sounded interesting and it was lgbtqa, but I’m struggling to remain interested.


Have you read any of these book? What do you think? What books have been in your recent book hauls?

Uncategorized

ARC Review- Blood of the Pack aka lesbian werewolves

Overall enjoyment: 2.5/5

Characterization: 2/5

Overall worldbuilding: 3/5

Diversity: 3/5

I was given a free advance copy of this book through Netgalley in return for an honest review. This book will be released on August 13th.

I wanted desperately to like this book more than I did. Lesbian werewolves?! I was so excited. I was pumped. I became very frustrated very quickly. First, I didn’t realize that this was part of a series. My fault I didn’t do the research and so some things were confusing but may have been explained in previous books of the series. This is book three. Some confusion though was not what truly frustrated me so much as the missed potential of this book. The premise of the book and most of the major plot points were amazing ideas! I could have easily fallen in love with this book if not for the writing style. Now, that may sound petty, but listen. Every problem that arose in this book was solved in what felt like five pages or less. Any part of the book that could have been a secret or big reveal to other characters was somehow discovered through the random senses of the characters. It made me want to scream.

The characters of this book were pretty lackluster. They had potential. A female alpha paired with a woman who has been abused by alphas? There was a lot of potential for long conversation, dates, mutual respect and honest. Beautiful character development. Did we get that? Nope, we got instant feelings and wolf senses. I’m not opposed to wolf senses. That’s one of parts of werewolf stories that I enjoy, but senses were used to replace any meaningful conversation and compromises.  

Worldbuilding: It seems to be set in modern times, but there was definitely an attempt to develop a history and culture. There was mention older wolf packs and battles. Kenrick had different bracelets that represented different things. I appreciated the attempt though I still felt a bit off put at time about the dominant and submissive roles. There may have been what I felt like a sexist line or two in there.

Diversity. This story had at least a bit of diversity. There are obviously lesbian women in this book which is refreshing for a change. There are hints that Zaria is a woman of color. There may also be a transgender character? I’m not quite sure if that’s the case or there is some added female alpha wolf anatomy happening.

Overall, if you don’t mind insta-feelings stories where the romance is mostly the focus you could enjoy this story. If you’re looking for something more in-depth with lots of fantasy action and a more slow build relationship this book is NOT for you. I wanted to like this book. I was so very excited about it, but it was just frustrating to read.


Have you read this book? Is it on your TBR? What do you think?

ARC

ARC Review- Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Overall enjoyment: 4/5

Characterization: 5/5

World building: 4/5

Diversity: 3/5

Note: A free copy of this book was given to me through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This book will be officially released on July 23, 2019.

When I first requested to read this book through Netgalley I thought it was a present-day retelling. Not the case, this novel is set in the 1920s. It’s not a bad thing, but just something I thought might be of interest for others to know. I really enjoyed this story. I love most mythology themed novels, but this one dug deep and asked us to really consider what it means to be human and what it might mean to be a god.

The characters, as always for me, were a huge selling point. I think the author did a fantastic job of making her characters dynamic. There was no all good or all bad. I really vibed a lot with what Casiopea was feeling as a young woman and I think that really endeared her to me. She’s got a temper, but in this case, it was to her benefit. Then, Hun-KamÉ, honestly, he was probably my favorite. I loved the exploration between godhood and humanity that Moreno-Garcia did with him. While I love stories wrapped in myth I’m also very picky how gods are portrayed. This was a representation I really enjoyed.

World building was minor in that it was 1920s Earth, but the mythology and how it would interact with the world today was beautifully done. It was seamlessly woven. I feel like I learned a lot about certain parts of Mayan mythology.

Diversity. This was based purely on Hispanic/Mayan characters. Casiopea was also our main character. So, double points for having a woman of color as the protagonist!

Overall, if you enjoy the modernization of old gods I’d say you will definitely enjoy this book. Also, if that isn’t your cup of tea, but you enjoy a book that gives you some little bits to think over then you could still very much enjoy this book. It’s deeper than what you first might expect. Don’t forget to keep an eye out for its release this July!

ARC

ARC Review- Spin the Dawn by Eliabeth Lim

Overall enjoyment: 4/5

Characterization: 3/5

World building: 5/5

Diversity: 3/5

Note: A free copy of this book was given to me through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Review

This book really surprised me. From reading the summary I thought it was going to basically be Mulan, but instead of being a solider she’d be a tailor. Spinning the Dawn is so much more than that! It does start out with a very Mulan feel in the beginning, but I love Mulan so that wasn’t a big deal to me. But, then the story expanded and we got into some nice lore of the world. I was completely sucked in for all, but a small portion of this book.

Now, lets talk about the characters. Mainly Maia and Edan. Maia is our Mulan, a strong, skilled woman who has big dreams that are limited by her gender. I really enjoyed reading her she’s strong and willing to work very hard for what she wants. The only thing that really was a downside of her was that she really didn’t seem to have a flaw. She had moments of weakness and being a woman in this story made things difficult for her, but otherwise I didn’t really pick up on a flaw. Edan, is charming. I was a bit suspicious of him and I don’t want to give any spoilers away, but I really enjoyed his character. He’s where there’s a lot of cool backstory. He also doesn’t have to seem to really have a flaw. Other than the lack of even a small character flaw in my opinion I really enjoy these characters.

World building. I loved the bits of lore that this book gave us. There are obviously a variety of beliefs and stories. They’re so well written that I really enjoyed how they twined into the story. There’s some other little things with world building like different currency and whatnot, but I’m in it for the lore.

This book has diversity in that it is based around a woman of color based in a world that seems to be based to my understanding on China.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book and got more out of it that I originally anticipated. If you enjoyed Mulan or just a good fantasy read I would encourage you to purchase this book when it is released on July 9th.

lists, Uncategorized

Five Fantastic LGBTQ+ Authors You Should Read

So, it’s pride month and I thought it would be a great time to post about my favorite LGBTQ+ authors. We get a lot of straight people writing these stories and while I’m not opposed to that idea if the story is well written I think members of the community really deserve their time to shine. I must admit this is also a very limited list. I’ve only read a limited amount of #ownvoices lgbtq+ fiction, but that doesn’t make these authors any less fantastic.

  1. TJ Klune: a phenomenal author. I would say he has a great range of writing with numerous published novels. I really couldn’t recommend him enough. I especially enjoy his fantasy work. You can check him out here.


2. Victoria Lee: A newly published author, but I really enjoyed her first novel, Fever King. You can find her here.


3. Kayla Ancrum: This woman doesn’t play. Her book ,The Wicker King, takes a serious look at the effects mental illness can have on someone. Very friendly and willing to talk with fans. You can find her here.


4. Natasha Ngan: All I can say is that Girls of Paper and Fire is still my favorite f/f novel. It was really the first one that I could really connect with. Check out here twitter.


5. Amy Rose Capetta: She has written numerous books as well. I’m especially excited to read Once & Future. You can check her out here.


Have you heard of any of these authors? Do you have any new authors to recommend? I’d love to read more LGBTQ+ authors.

Fun Stuff

Happy Pride Month!

Photo by Elyssa Fahndrich on Unsplash

I just wanted to take the time to wish everyone a happy pride month. As someone who identifies as bisexual I understand the importance of being able to celebrate who you are. This is a crazy time in the US right now, but I hope we can all come together to support one another in love and acceptance.

Also, if you’re interested. Here are a couple links to blog posts featuring LGBTQ+ characters and authors.

8 Queer Books by Asian Authors by BiblioNyan

Someone will remember us blog by readingrainbow. Note: This blog is purely for LGBT media so anything they post is amazing.


Do you celebrate pride month? Do you have any good lgbtq+ book recs or relevant blog posts? Please share in the comments! I’d love to hear from you.

Reviews

Stunning- How Long ‘Til Black Future Month by N.K. Jemisin

Overall Enjoyment: 4/5

Characterization: 5/5

World building: 5/5

Diversity: 4/5

Goodreads Summary: In these stories, Jemisin sharply examines modern society, infusing magic into the mundane, and drawing deft parallels in the fantasy realms of her imagination. Dragons and hateful spirits haunt the flooded city of New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In a parallel universe, a utopian society watches our world, trying to learn from our mistakes. A black mother in the Jim Crow south must figure out how to save her daughter from a fey offering impossible promises. And in the Hugo award-nominated short story “The City Born Great,” a young street kid fights to give birth to an old metropolis’s soul.

Review

I chose this book mainly based on the summary, but also because I’ve heard such great things about N.K. Jemisin’s writing, but was having a hard time committing fully to reading one of her full length novels. I’m generally not a fan of short stories, but Jemisin really impressed me. She has an amazing ability to pull you straight into a world in a very short amount of written words. She definitely introduced a lot of new ideas in fantasy and syfy that I hadn’t considered or thought about before, but really enjoyed. There was a large mix of stories and topics that were covered in this anthology. Most I really enjoyed though there were a few in the mix that I didn’t care for.

Characterization: I can’t go into detail about all the characters because there are so many for them, but even though most of these stories are no more than 10-ish pages I still felt drawn into all the characters lives that were exposed to me. These stories contained so much detail and at times emotions that it is hard not to root for most of the characters.

World building: Jemisin just throws you into her worlds with really no build up. When most authors do this it leaves me confused and left to muddle through it until everything is slowly revealed which I personally find frustrating. But, not here! Jemisin has talent to not only throw you into multiple different worlds through her stories, but also the skill to have it all make sense with little to no explanation. A mastery of the craft.

Diversity: This book focused mostly on characters of color with a variety of thoughts and sexualities. I would say we definitely had a lot of different enjoyable viewpoints.

Overall: I would say its definitely worth the read even if, like me, you’re not a fan of short stories. These stories have left me satisfied with their completeness as well as uniqueness.


Have you read this book? Is it on your TBR? Let me know what you think!